Science Activities

Bending Water Science Experiment

Bending Water Science Experiment is a simple science experiment that allows kids to play with the unseen force of static electricity. Kids will be amazed at what seems like magic, but can be explained by scientific principles.

bending-water-science-experiment-for-kids

Bending Water Science Experiment

All you need for this simple science experiment is a plastic comb, a water faucet, and your hair. Using a plastic comb, comb through your dry hair ten times. If the weather is humid that day, your hair might not be dry enough. Try rubbing the comb on carpet instead.

 

Next, turn on the faucet so that a narrow stream of water is flowing. Slowly, move the teeth of the comb close to the stream of water, but do not touch the water. As the comb gets closer to the water, the stream of water should start to bend toward your comb. If it doesn’t, comb through your hair 10 more times. Once you get the water to bend toward the comb, you can start to experiment. Try these experiment ideas:

  • Adjust the flow of the water. Does this affect how much the water bends or how close the comb needs to be to the stream?
  • If you have a comb made of something different than plastic, does it affect the reaction of the water?
  • Try this with other people’s hair. Is there a difference in the outcome?

Explaining The Science of Bending Water Science Experiment

The unseen force in this experiment is static electricity. Static electricity is the buildup of electrical charge on an object. When the electrically charged object comes into contact with an object with the opposite charge, the electrons flow from one object to another. This happens then you walk across a carpeted room and touch a door knob and get shocked. When the comb ran through your hair, it picked up negatively charged electrons from the hair. This caused the atoms of the comb to have a negative charge. When things are negatively charged, they attract things that have a positive charge. The stream of water had a positive charge, so it was attracted to the negatively charged comb and bent in it’s direction. Try this at home and let us know what happened.

 

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About the author

Beth Gorden

Beth Gorden is the creative multi-tasking creator of Kindergarten Worksheets and Games. As a busy homeschooling mother of six, she strives to create hands-on learning activities and worksheets that kids will love to make learning FUN! Beth is also the creator of 123Homeschool4Me.com where she shares more than 100,000 pages of FREE worksheets,& educational ideas for PreK-8th grade along with recipes and mom tips as well.

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