Friday, December 15, 2017

Frost in a Can Science Experiment

  • This site uses affiliate links. Purchasing through these links does not cost you anything additional, but gives us a small referral fee.
  • This is a recreational blog. Although I've done my best to ensure the safety of each activity, clarity of directions, and accuracy of my educational activities; I can in NO way be held liable for your personal use of my material. Please use common sense.
See all disclosures here.
Now that winter will be here soon, bring the fun of winter indoors without having to put on mittens. This fun frost in a can science experiment is a classic that kids will love to make over and over again. The activity is simple enough that kindergarten kids can do it with ease, and it is also classroom friendly.
Frost in a Can Science Experiment for kids - this science project is a fun way for toddler, preschool, kindergarten, first grade to learn about why frost happens. Perfect winter science experiment for at home, homeschool, or classroom.


Frost in a Can Science Experiment

Making frost in a can is a fun science activity for kindergarten kids. Kids will love that they can make frost and freezing temperatures right at home.


You'll need just a few things to make your frost in a can:

  • Salt
  • Ice
  • Can
Make sure your can is opened correctly so that it won't cut little fingers as they do this activity.
Fill the can up with ice, then fill it about halfway with water.


Show the kids how to sprinkle salt in the can, then cover the top.

Shake it up a bit, then wait about 3 minutes.

frost science fair project

Frost will start forming on the outside of the can.

If you think your frost needs a little help, try adding a bit more salt or shaking it up a bit more.
Depending on how cold it is in your house, it make take a bit more time for frost to form.
After about 3 minutes, you'll be able to scratch the frost off with a nail.

homeschool science experiment


THE SCIENCE BEHIND FROST IN A CAN

Condensation forms when the temperature inside the can varies drastically from the temperature outside the can. When you use ice and lower the melt point of the ice, the process happens faster and more drastically, causing frost to form on the outside of the can.




No comments:

Post a Comment